What Makes Me Hire A Developer?

I’m going into a new round of interviewing developers for my team so I’ve been giving a lot of thought to what I look for when I’m interviewing people to work with.

Joel Spolsky says that you need to look for two things, brains and the ability to get things done. His reasoning is that developers who are smart but never finish jobs belong in never ending research projects, developers who get things done but aren’t smart end up causing you more work and if your candidate has neither then you should run a mile!

While I like his logic I have a few other criteria.

Joel doesn’t mention the candidate’s passion, their ability to learn, to form relationships with their team, or to empathise with the customer. In my eyes a developer who doesn’t have these qualities will negatively impact your team’s dynamic and product just as much as someone who produces bugs for a living.

So why an ability to learn? I hope this one fairly obvious. In our fast paced development world a developer’s ability to learn new technologies, absorb ideas and keep up with current trends is (in my opinion) more valuable than whether they have an in depth understanding of bitwise operators or lambda expressions. I’m not saying don’t ask about the technical side, but make sure your candidate can learn your code, your technologies and whatever comes along next!

Relationships? How many times have you worked alongside someone who can’t work in a team? They’re territorial, overly sensitive and horde knowledge with the misguided belief it makes them invulnerable. Look for people who enjoy the camaraderie and take time to teach and learn from their colleagues.

Empathy for the customer? This is, in my view one of the most important. Can your candidate put themselves in the shoes of your clients? Can they envisage how a bad release will impact your reputation? Do they understand the consequences to people’s working day when your code doesn’t work as expected? Find someone who understands the frustrations of bad software and poor customer service and you’ll find someone who will strive to prevent it!

Passion? Simply put I want a developer who wants to develop software! I don’t mean you have to spend every evening and weekend writing code or contributing to open source projects but demonstrate to me that you enjoy what you do. Tell me about what you’re working on, explain that bug fix you’re really proud of but please prove to me that you’re there’s something about the job you actually enjoy (other than just the £££s).

So there you have it, a few of the qualities I want my developer candidates to demonstrate for me. What do you look for when you’re interviewing? What personality traits do you try to show when you’re being interviewed?

Why Technical Tests are both a Wonderful and Terrible Idea

When hiring for a new developer its extremely common to ask them to demonstrate their technical ability. Often this is a practical test to be done at home and then sent into the hiring manager.

It’s a nice idea, you get to see the candidate’s unhurried work, get a feel for their skills and potentially ask about them in a face to face interview later. It’s far harder for a bad developer to write good code than it is for them to learn a few answers about relational databases or solid principles.

However, I believe this approach is flawed!

To explain why I want to describe the recent experience of a friend of mine, an outstanding developer who recently applied for a development role. The technical test was presented to him and he completed it, he’d had a rather manic week and so determined not to miss his deadline so he worked late I tot he night. He confessed to me later that he probably spent somewhere between ten and twelve hours on that piece of work!

What happened?

The company rejected him with a series of bullet points over design choices without ever giving him the chance to explain why he’d made those decisions.

So let me ask you this, do you think friend is ever going to waste his time with one of their roles in the future? Do you think I, knowing his experience would apply for one of their jobs? What about the rest of our friendship group?

My point is this – any hiring manager will tell you how scarce good development resource is. By demanding eight, ten, maybe even twelve hours of our candidates’ time and then throwing it away, that’s (in my view) arrogance.

What’s more it doesn’t actually tell you very much! Sat at home what’s to stop someone googling the question, posting something on Stack Overflow, or asking a friend to complete the test for them? How do you know that the candidate’s work is their own?

So what do I recommend instead?

I’m hoping to start recruiting over the next week months and I intend to send code review tasks out to my candidates. Why?

  • Asking someone to review your code gives them a chance to suggest improvements and identify where you’ve not used best practices
  • Code reviews ask candidates to explain and articulate their views, something a straightforward programming challenge doesn’t
  • You still get the same feel of a candidate’s focus (do they focus on code clarity, performance or UI aspects?)
  • You are demanding far less of a candidate’s time and therefore aren’t putting off people applying for the role

Will my approach work? I don’t know, we’ll find out! What are your experiences with practical coding challenges? Do they work?

The Importance of your Local Development Community

I recently saw a post on LinkedIn, I’m fairly sure it was an advert for in house training but the message rang true. One manager turned to the other and said “If we train our developers they’ll get better and leave!” To which the other manager replied “But worse, if we don’t then they might stay!”

One of the most common reasons I hear from departing team members is boredom, that they want to go somewhere else and learn new things, use new technologies, and learn from other people. I myself have preached to friends on many an occasion that you learn more in your first few months at a new job than all the time afterwards combined.

You want the most eager, hungry, and interested developers on your team. You want to be able to retain them by introducing them to new ideas. It’s also your responsibility to keep your long serving members of staff from stagmenting and falling into a development rut.

The answer is often closer than you may think!

Local groups of developers are not hard to come by. I’m based in Leeds and to my knowledge we have Agile Yorkshire, Leeds Sharp, Leeds Code Dojo, and Leeds DevOps. Groups of people who meet regularly to discuss ideas, listen to speakers who bring new and exciting topics to the table. By visiting these groups I’ve been introduced to AngularJS, Microsoft Cognative Services, F#, .NET Core, and many many more…

By encouraging your developers to attend these events you motivate them to go out and find new ideas and technologies. Far better for them to have a night out, come back full of new knowledge than decide they’re fed up of using the same technologies over and over.

So how can you encourage participation in these events? Why not arrange to go as a group? Encourage someone to speak and bring the team along to support them. Plan a team night meal afterwards or ask someone to bring ideas back to your own internal training. Who knows, you may even bump into your next hire while you’re there!