The Three Ways of DevOps

If you’ve ever read The Phoenix Project (or pretty much any other DevOps book) then you’ll most have heard about the three ways.

The first time I heard the name I imagined some deep levels of understanding that the DevOps Sensai was imparting mystical knowledge to young grasshopper. I still like the mental image but having read a little deeper I believe they are three steps to building a successful collaborative team.

Let’s look at the three ways.

The First Way – Systems Thinking

The idea of the first way is to appreciate that each series of tasks is interconnected into a complex system. Recently I described how a delay at one stage in the system knocks on to each subsequent task, having a good understanding of the overall system allows you to identify where your bottlenecks are, exploit them and avoid work queuing up in front of any individual person or process.

The Second Way – Amplifying Feedback

The second way is all about looking at what happens at the end of the system and using that knowledge to improve the process. If a particular result is of a poor quality then the team need to know so they can focus more effort in the testing phases. Equally if a release is of a particularly high quality or gets good customer feedback then the team need to know that what they are doing works!

The Third Way – Experimentation

The third way is about constant experimentation and improvement. The team is willing to take risks (because they know their feedback loops are good and they will find out about any issues quickly). These teams adapt to changes quickly and are not afraid to challenge processes just because “that’s the way we’ve always done it”.
I believe that the fact these ‘ways’ are numbered is in fact very important. Without an appreciation of the end to end system it’s impossible to develop strong feedback, after all where does the system end and where should your feedback be coming from!? Equally, without this strong feedback experimentation is extremely dangerous – you may in fact be making things worse!

I also believe that these concepts can be introduced to a scrum team to lift them to the next level. By introducing ideas such as systems thinking and feedback (already a strong Agile theme) you’re asking the question of what in fact is the definition of done? DevOps encourages collaboration across Development and Operations, if a scrum team includes both roles then it’s logical that work is only “Done” when it is running properly in a customer’s environment. That surely, is the ultimate goal of any software development team?

Have you come across the The Ways? What are your thoughts? Can you use them in a scrum team?

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