Measuring Sprint Velocity is Useless Unless You Ship!

I’ve recently been reading The Goal by Eli Goldratt, in it Alex Rogo (the Plant Manager) boasts to an old teacher of his that the new robots they’ve installed have greatly increased their efficiency. The Yodaesque Jonah then promptly proves his data worthless and sets Alex on the path to enlightenment.

What struck me however was how clearly this mirrors the software industry. The Goal has been the go-to book for managers for years but only with the relatively recent release of books like The Phoenix Projext have the applications to software industries been recognised.

It’s a well established idea to model a software development team like a factory. Time and money goes in, features and fixes come out. In the story Alex was delighted that his robots had given him an increased efficiency for making a particular part of the process, it was only when Jonah pointed out that the robots did not result in any increase in sales that he saw the problem in his logic.

So, let’s imagine that our software business is Alex’s factory. We’ve brought in a robot to do the work of the Development Team and Sprint Velocity has gone up from 100 Story Points to 300. As the Development Manager you get to pat yourself on the back, celebrate your success, and go home at the end of the day.

But what happens to your release at the end of your Sprint? Is your product stacked up on your factory floor awaiting the next machine (perhaps your deployment or infrastructure team)? Or have you sold it and added value to your business?

This may seem like false measurement, your numbers are telling you that you’re delivering but the reality is very different. The truth however is even worse, unshipped features are the software equivalent of Work in Progress, they’re the half finished products sat on your factory floor taking up time and space. Until your business can deliver them they’ll continue to come back and haunt you, injecting unplanned work into your Sprints and sucking time out of your Development Team.

So, If your Sprint Velocity measurements only take into account the work pushed through your Development Team then you’re not measuring the value you’re adding to the business, you’re making the same mistake as Rogo and only considering one part of the system. You may be getting great results, but are you helping achieve the goal!?